wildcat2030:

Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha - “Siri, why do you struggle with conversations?”
“I don’t know what you mean - how about a web search for it?”
If you want the latest football scores, to add meetings to your calendar or launch an app, today’s virtual assistants are relatively good at understanding your voice and doing what’s asked. But try to have the type of natural conversation seen in sci-fi movies featuring artificial intelligence systems - from HAL in 2001 to the sultry-voiced operating system Samantha in Spike Jonze’s Her - and you’ll find your device about as smart as a waterproof teabag. “Google and Apple are painfully aware that their systems are not getting better fast enough because right now Siri and Google Now and the other personal assistant type applications are all programmed by hand,” says Steve Young, professor of information engineering at the University of Cambridge. “If you speak to Siri about baseball it seems relatively intelligent, but if you ask it something much less common it doesn’t really do anything except for a web search. “That’s an indication that the programmers have been busy trying to anticipate what people want to ask about baseball but haven’t thought about people who ask about, for example, GPU chips because you don’t get many queries about that.” (via BBC News - Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha)

Woah… I used to be siri…?

wildcat2030:

Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha
-
“Siri, why do you struggle with conversations?”

“I don’t know what you mean - how about a web search for it?”

If you want the latest football scores, to add meetings to your calendar or launch an app, today’s virtual assistants are relatively good at understanding your voice and doing what’s asked. But try to have the type of natural conversation seen in sci-fi movies featuring artificial intelligence systems - from HAL in 2001 to the sultry-voiced operating system Samantha in Spike Jonze’s Her - and you’ll find your device about as smart as a waterproof teabag. “Google and Apple are painfully aware that their systems are not getting better fast enough because right now Siri and Google Now and the other personal assistant type applications are all programmed by hand,” says Steve Young, professor of information engineering at the University of Cambridge. “If you speak to Siri about baseball it seems relatively intelligent, but if you ask it something much less common it doesn’t really do anything except for a web search. “That’s an indication that the programmers have been busy trying to anticipate what people want to ask about baseball but haven’t thought about people who ask about, for example, GPU chips because you don’t get many queries about that.” (via BBC News - Artificial intelligence: How to turn Siri into Samantha)

Woah… I used to be siri…?

Occasionally I’ll be sitting somewhere and I’ll be listening to someone perhaps not saying the kindest things about me. And I’ll look down at my hand and I’ll sort of pinch my skin to make sure it still has the requisite thickness I know Eleanor Roosevelt expects me to have.

Hillary Clinton (x)

(Source: audreyno)

twicr:

Recently discovered the comic strip “We The Robots” by Chris Harding which ran from 2007 to 2009. Any suggestions for other good robot-themed web comics out there?

Hahaha! Creepy…

twicr:

Recently discovered the comic strip “We The Robots” by Chris Harding which ran from 2007 to 2009. Any suggestions for other good robot-themed web comics out there?

Hahaha! Creepy…

The dissemination of information on the web does not liberate information from top-down taxonomies. It reifies those taxonomies. Computers do not invent new categories; they make use of the ones we give them, warts and all. And the increasing amount of information they process can easily fool us into thinking that the underlying categories they use are not just a model of reality, but reality itself.

Arting pro-tip

rynnay:

If something is turning so shitty you have to start over, then start over.

Take five minutes to bitch, then just start the fuck over. Nobody has to see your jacked up mistakes but you; just start over. Don’t keep trying to polish a piece of crap, don’t be stubborn, see that it’s a piece of crap…

Just change it….

abcstarstuff:

WE’RE STUFFED


Shows how precarious everyday life is - live it to the fullest lest an asteroid falls on your head :)

abcstarstuff:

WE’RE STUFFED

Shows how precarious everyday life is - live it to the fullest lest an asteroid falls on your head :)

thebacklot:

Chinese theater accidentally displays fan photoshop poster of Thor cradling Loki in his arms.


Awesome!

thebacklot:

Chinese theater accidentally displays fan photoshop poster of Thor cradling Loki in his arms.

Awesome!

omnireboot:

It’s extremely refreshing to read a book about AI which presents a critique of Ray Kurzweil and his role in popularizing the concept of a technological Singularity. In your estimation, is Ray Kurzweil a dangerous man?
Barrat: Dangerous isn’t a word I’m comfortable using about someone who’s contributed so much to the world. He’s enriched countless lives, including mine, with his inventions and ideas. But he’s taken one idea—Vernor Vinge’s technological singularity—and rebranded it as a wholly positive techno-utopia, complete with freedom from disease and eternal life. It’s as if he doesn’t know that powerful technologies are often used for bad ends. Look at AI-based autonomous killing drones, being developed now. Look at how the NSA is using data mining AI to abuse the Constitution. Advanced AI is a dual use technology, like nuclear fission, able to lift us up, and to crush us. It’s different in kind from every other technology, from fire on up. Kurzweil isn’t himself dangerous, but to minimize the downside of advanced AI in the futurist narrative is reckless and misleading. I’m glad Our Final Invention presents the long overdue counterpoint.

omnireboot:

It’s extremely refreshing to read a book about AI which presents a critique of Ray Kurzweil and his role in popularizing the concept of a technological Singularity. In your estimation, is Ray Kurzweil a dangerous man?

Barrat: Dangerous isn’t a word I’m comfortable using about someone who’s contributed so much to the world. He’s enriched countless lives, including mine, with his inventions and ideas. But he’s taken one idea—Vernor Vinge’s technological singularity—and rebranded it as a wholly positive techno-utopia, complete with freedom from disease and eternal life. It’s as if he doesn’t know that powerful technologies are often used for bad ends. Look at AI-based autonomous killing drones, being developed now. Look at how the NSA is using data mining AI to abuse the Constitution. Advanced AI is a dual use technology, like nuclear fission, able to lift us up, and to crush us. It’s different in kind from every other technology, from fire on up. Kurzweil isn’t himself dangerous, but to minimize the downside of advanced AI in the futurist narrative is reckless and misleading. I’m glad Our Final Invention presents the long overdue counterpoint.